Latest news
Thumbnail
Science & Technology

Millions Of People View Total Eclipse In US

The moon's dark shadow swept across the United States in a total solar eclipse on Monday, thrilling millions of spectators with a Great American Solar Eclipse.

Science.com reported that the total eclipse was the first in nearly a century to cast the moon's shadow on the entire US - the last one was in 1918.

The moon's shadow crossed 14 states, from Oregon to South Carolina, along a path that is home to 12.2 million people, NASA officials said.

The Independent reported that as the moon slowly turned the sun over New York City into a crescent — creeping toward a partial eclipse— the crowd at the American Museum of Natural History occasionally burst into premature applause.

Staring up through silver-lensed glasses made special to block direct sunlight, thousands of people craned their necks to view the eclipse.

It didn’t matter, though. The eclipse was being billed as a once-in-a-lifetime event, reported The Independent.

“I haven’t experienced an eclipse in a very long time,” Greg Packer, a retired highway worker, told The Independent.

“I remember [watching a solar eclipse] from my childhood,” Sharnette Johnson, 36, said.

Another 200 million Americans were within a day's drive of totality, with tourists also flying in from other states and countries, The Independent reported.

"I think this will be recorded as, to date, the most-viewed eclipse in history," Lou Mayo, a NASA planetary scientist seeing his first total solar eclipse, told reporters.

Science & Technology

Millions Of People View Total Eclipse In US

A NASA scientist said this was probably the most viewed total eclipse in history, which crossed an area that is home to over 12 million people.

Thumbnail

The moon's dark shadow swept across the United States in a total solar eclipse on Monday, thrilling millions of spectators with a Great American Solar Eclipse.

Science.com reported that the total eclipse was the first in nearly a century to cast the moon's shadow on the entire US - the last one was in 1918.

The moon's shadow crossed 14 states, from Oregon to South Carolina, along a path that is home to 12.2 million people, NASA officials said.

The Independent reported that as the moon slowly turned the sun over New York City into a crescent — creeping toward a partial eclipse— the crowd at the American Museum of Natural History occasionally burst into premature applause.

Staring up through silver-lensed glasses made special to block direct sunlight, thousands of people craned their necks to view the eclipse.

It didn’t matter, though. The eclipse was being billed as a once-in-a-lifetime event, reported The Independent.

“I haven’t experienced an eclipse in a very long time,” Greg Packer, a retired highway worker, told The Independent.

“I remember [watching a solar eclipse] from my childhood,” Sharnette Johnson, 36, said.

Another 200 million Americans were within a day's drive of totality, with tourists also flying in from other states and countries, The Independent reported.

"I think this will be recorded as, to date, the most-viewed eclipse in history," Lou Mayo, a NASA planetary scientist seeing his first total solar eclipse, told reporters.

Share this post