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Elections 2018

Some Election Candidates ‘Giving False Hope’

Lawyers said election candidates should adjust their campaign slogans based on the authorities given to legislators by the Constitution. 

As thousands of election campaign posters go up around Kabul legal experts have said that many candidates are running with slogans that are not within their authority to meet. 

More than 2,500 candidates, including 400 women, will compete for 249 parliamentary seats on the October 20 elections – 804 of them are from Kabul. 

The candidates have emblazoned almost everything with their photos and slogans. Posters and banners and also billboards have gone up city-wide, which many have their posters emblazoned on their vehicles, houses and T-walls. Local TV channels are also running ads for candidates and social media platforms are rife with their content. 

But one lawyer told TOLOnews that some candidates are claiming to do the impossible. 

One said he would solve the Kabul traffic problem if he wins, while another promised a luxury lifestyle if he secured a seat in parliament. 

Others focused on ensuring justice, security and equality and some promised to turn Afghanistan into a prosperous and peaceful country.  

“A slogan should be based on articles 90, 91 and 93 of the Constitution. They should not mix the three pillars because ensuring security is the responsibility of government forces,” said Misbah, a lawyer.

Articles 90, 91 and 93 have outlined authorities for a member of the Afghan parliament. 

Article 90 of the Constitution says that the National Assembly shall have the duties of ratification, modification or abrogation of laws or legislative decrees; approval of social, cultural, economic and technological development programs; approval of the state budget and permission to obtain or grant loans; creation, modification and or abrogation of administrative units; ratification of international treaties and agreements, or abrogation of membership of Afghanistan in them.

Article 93 also states that any commission of both houses of parliament can question any Minister about special issues. The individual questioned shall provide an oral or written response.

“The principle of election campaigns has not mentioned this but as it looks that slogans of some candidates is beyond the authorities of an MP,” said Azizullah Ibrahimi, deputy spokesman for the Independent Election Commission.

Kabul residents called on parliamentary candidates not to give the people “false” hope with slogans and commitments which they cannot deliver.

“The slogans should be applicable in the future,” said Hamid, a Kabul resident.

“They (candidates) say that they are going to ensure security and justice. This is not their duty,” said Musa, a Kabul resident.

Elections 2018

Some Election Candidates ‘Giving False Hope’

Lawyers said election candidates should adjust their campaign slogans based on the authorities given to legislators by the Constitution. 

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As thousands of election campaign posters go up around Kabul legal experts have said that many candidates are running with slogans that are not within their authority to meet. 

More than 2,500 candidates, including 400 women, will compete for 249 parliamentary seats on the October 20 elections – 804 of them are from Kabul. 

The candidates have emblazoned almost everything with their photos and slogans. Posters and banners and also billboards have gone up city-wide, which many have their posters emblazoned on their vehicles, houses and T-walls. Local TV channels are also running ads for candidates and social media platforms are rife with their content. 

But one lawyer told TOLOnews that some candidates are claiming to do the impossible. 

One said he would solve the Kabul traffic problem if he wins, while another promised a luxury lifestyle if he secured a seat in parliament. 

Others focused on ensuring justice, security and equality and some promised to turn Afghanistan into a prosperous and peaceful country.  

“A slogan should be based on articles 90, 91 and 93 of the Constitution. They should not mix the three pillars because ensuring security is the responsibility of government forces,” said Misbah, a lawyer.

Articles 90, 91 and 93 have outlined authorities for a member of the Afghan parliament. 

Article 90 of the Constitution says that the National Assembly shall have the duties of ratification, modification or abrogation of laws or legislative decrees; approval of social, cultural, economic and technological development programs; approval of the state budget and permission to obtain or grant loans; creation, modification and or abrogation of administrative units; ratification of international treaties and agreements, or abrogation of membership of Afghanistan in them.

Article 93 also states that any commission of both houses of parliament can question any Minister about special issues. The individual questioned shall provide an oral or written response.

“The principle of election campaigns has not mentioned this but as it looks that slogans of some candidates is beyond the authorities of an MP,” said Azizullah Ibrahimi, deputy spokesman for the Independent Election Commission.

Kabul residents called on parliamentary candidates not to give the people “false” hope with slogans and commitments which they cannot deliver.

“The slogans should be applicable in the future,” said Hamid, a Kabul resident.

“They (candidates) say that they are going to ensure security and justice. This is not their duty,” said Musa, a Kabul resident.

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