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52,000 Patients In A Year; MoPH Says Cardiac Disease On The Rise

Officials said MoPH registers 52,000 cardiac patients in a year of which 1,039 of them were from Kabul City.

The Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) has registered 52,000 cardiac patients in government-owned health facilities in the country in a year while the number of those suffering heart disease is on the rise, officials from MoPH said on Saturday.

Almost 50 percent of cardiac disease patients die due to lack of medical facilities, medical equipment and lack of heart specialists, the ministry said.  

From the 52,000 cardiac patients, 1,039 of them were from Kabul, the capital city, the ministry said.  

The MoPH officials said developing countries in the world have the highest number of cardiac patients. 

“The general surgery department of Kabul Medical University has been established to provide quality surgery services to the people,” said Shirin Aqa Zarif, head of Kabul Medical University as he addressed an event on World Heart Day in Kabul on Saturday.  

“High blood pressure, highblood lipids, smoking and lack of physical movements cause cardiac diseases,” said Abdul Wadood Zobin, a cardiac specialist. 

Officials from World Health Organization meanwhile said they continue to provide more technical support to Afghanistan for prevention and treatment of cardiac diseases. 

“Afghanistan is experiencing the epidemiological transition of diseases,” Supriya Warusavithana a program manager at WHO, said.

Mohammad Amin, a Ghazni resident, said he had a cardiac surgery in Kabul last week and that he feels better now. 

Amin said he has spent 250,000 AFs for his treatment. 

“I had no health problem, but suddenly I found that my heart has a problem. I spent three days at Ghazni hospital, but then I came to Kabul as there was no facility in my province,” said Amin. 

Despite improvements in public hospitals and in the health sector for treatment of cardiac diseases, a cardiac surgery in a private hospital will cost up to 150,000 AFs, a surgeon said, who wished not to be named.

Khatira Zahin, a cardiac specialist in a private hospital in Kabul, said the number of cardiac patients who visit the health facility is increasing. She said they often visit up to 15 patients a day and that half of them are cardiac patients.  

“The number of Cardiac patients is on the rise, especially among people under 40 years of age,” said Zahin. 

Science & Technology

52,000 Patients In A Year; MoPH Says Cardiac Disease On The Rise

Officials said MoPH registers 52,000 cardiac patients in a year of which 1,039 of them were from Kabul City.

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The Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) has registered 52,000 cardiac patients in government-owned health facilities in the country in a year while the number of those suffering heart disease is on the rise, officials from MoPH said on Saturday.

Almost 50 percent of cardiac disease patients die due to lack of medical facilities, medical equipment and lack of heart specialists, the ministry said.  

From the 52,000 cardiac patients, 1,039 of them were from Kabul, the capital city, the ministry said.  

The MoPH officials said developing countries in the world have the highest number of cardiac patients. 

“The general surgery department of Kabul Medical University has been established to provide quality surgery services to the people,” said Shirin Aqa Zarif, head of Kabul Medical University as he addressed an event on World Heart Day in Kabul on Saturday.  

“High blood pressure, highblood lipids, smoking and lack of physical movements cause cardiac diseases,” said Abdul Wadood Zobin, a cardiac specialist. 

Officials from World Health Organization meanwhile said they continue to provide more technical support to Afghanistan for prevention and treatment of cardiac diseases. 

“Afghanistan is experiencing the epidemiological transition of diseases,” Supriya Warusavithana a program manager at WHO, said.

Mohammad Amin, a Ghazni resident, said he had a cardiac surgery in Kabul last week and that he feels better now. 

Amin said he has spent 250,000 AFs for his treatment. 

“I had no health problem, but suddenly I found that my heart has a problem. I spent three days at Ghazni hospital, but then I came to Kabul as there was no facility in my province,” said Amin. 

Despite improvements in public hospitals and in the health sector for treatment of cardiac diseases, a cardiac surgery in a private hospital will cost up to 150,000 AFs, a surgeon said, who wished not to be named.

Khatira Zahin, a cardiac specialist in a private hospital in Kabul, said the number of cardiac patients who visit the health facility is increasing. She said they often visit up to 15 patients a day and that half of them are cardiac patients.  

“The number of Cardiac patients is on the rise, especially among people under 40 years of age,” said Zahin. 

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